v.1 is RISD’s student–led publication. Its form and content change from year to year (it’s always “volume 1”).

Info & Submission Guidelines ︎


Spring 2019

  1. From the Editors
  2. A Room without a View: Reflections on Studio Practice from a Privileged Poor Chantal Feitosa
  3. Between the Battlements Jeremy Wolin

  4. Accessing Color: Dissecting the Harvard Art Museum’s Forbes Pigment Collection Makoto Kumasaka
  5. British Club Tattoos Nasser Alzayani
  6. Making Space: Creativity and Resilience in War-Time Sri Lanka Elizabeth Dean Hermann
  7. How to Become Trans: A Proposal for the Modern-Day Gender-Agnostic Asher White
  8. Making It Up: A Conversation with Kent Kleinman Wen Zhuang
  9. “In Peace”: A Conversation with Matthew Shenoda Mays Albaik
  10. Suburbia_hours.mov Nora Mayer
  11. Negative Spaces Emily Wright
  12. Centerfold: Urgency Lab
  13. Rise Up: The Sunrise Movement Takes Root in Rhode Island Irina V. Wang
  14. After Strand Nafis White and García Sinclair
  15. Soldiers of Love? Karen Schiff
  16. Decoding Ghosts Molly Hastings
  17. An Annotated Bibliography Eli Backer
  18. Jesus, Marilyn, and Britney: Relationships between Religion and Celebrity Culture Nina Yuchi
  19. The Social (Antique) Network: Empathy in the Age of Digital Antiquing Zola Anderson
  20. My Little Episodes Michael Brandes
  21. Seeking Fair Game on Hidden Fields Reilly Blum
  22. The Should Be Here Is Not Here Joss Liao
  23. Index of Agency Sophie Chien
  24. Don’t Eat the Models Barbara Stehle
  25. Hypothetical Drink Personality Test: Who Said What, and When? Eliza Chen
  26. Dear Arabic Mohammed Nassem


Fall 2018 

  1. From the Editors
  2. How to Make a Person: A Recipe Mays Albaik
  3. Providence Votes Marcus Peabody
  4. Encounters with the Codex: Redefining Forms of Publication June Yoon
  5. How to Encounter a Puddle Anny Li
  6. A Brief List of Premises from a Maker Stuck with Paper, Politics, and Performance Yasi Alipour
  7. Art Writing and the Place of the “I” Randy Kennedy
  8. Written in Stone: Lineage, Legacy, and Letterforms Irina V. Wang
  9. The Unbearable Whiteness of Being (a Graphic Designer) Tiger Dingsun
  10. Colliers/Necklaces Théïa Flynn
  11. When One Door Closes: Examining Issues of Space and Student Curation on Campus Wen Zhuang
  12. Addressing the Empty Plinth: Lessons from Gallery Shows and Public Art Jeremy Wolin
  13. Modern Usage: In Conversation with Remeike Forbes Eliza Chen and Tiger Dingsun
  14. Dangling Threads: Remaining Unclear in Capital Everett Epstein
  15. A Vagabond Viking Voyage and Midsummer Daydream Mike Fink
  16. Everything is Interdependent Angela Dufresne
  17. La Bolita Elaine Lopez
  18. Bread Day Olive B. Godlee
  19. Against the Archive Satpreet Kahlon


2017 - 2018 
  1. Birds, Bees, and Beyond: The Nature Lab Evolves
  2. Concrete Mixer Drum Solo
  3. Negative Spaces
  4. “Printer Prosthetics” at NYABF
  5. On Writing: Nader Tehrani and Katie Faulkner
  6. On Writing: Marie Law Adams and Dan Adams
  7. On Writing: Kunlé Adeyemi
  8. Connecting Food and Design
  9. Remixing Architectural Discourse
  10. Genesis : 1: Beret Shit
  11. “No voy a actuar en el mundo antes de entenderlo”: Una conversación con Alfredo Jaar
  12. “I Will Not Act in the World Before Understanding the World”: A Conversation with Alfredo Jaar
  13. Imagining Irmgard
  14. Afterwords: Bite
  15. Afterwords: Portals
  16. Afterwords: Calendar
  17. Seeking Drafts
Mark

Remixing Architectural Discourse

Christina Schaller (MArch 2018)

In the graduate Architecture course Disciplinarity, taught by Architecture professor and department head Amy Kulper, each week we were given a set of readings centered around contemporary debates in architectural discourse and asked to respond with a quote, definition, image, and written response. In my responses I chose to use the act of sampling to shift each debate toward a social perspective. For this piece, the debate was “De-, Un-, Trans-, Multi-, Inter-: The One or the Many?” I paired a quote by Nina Simone that was sampled in Noname’s album Telefone with the definition of freedom. In the text, I pulled together short excerpts from the week’s course readings as well as from sources outside of the course to question the role of transdisciplinarity. The bracketed text is my way of bringing different voices together and including my own.

. . .

“What’s free to me? Just a feeling ... it’s just a feeling. It’s like how do you tell somebody how it feels to be in love? How are you going to tell anybody who has not been in love how it feels to be in love? You cannot do it to save your life. You can describe things, but you can’t tell them. But you know it, when it happens. That’s what I mean by “free.” I had a couple times on stage when I really felt free, and that’s something else. That’s really something else! I’ll tell you what freedom is to me: No fear!”—Nina Simone



Freedom | free•dom | Noun:
the power or right to act, speak, or think as one wants without hindrance or restraint.
the state of being physically unrestricted and able to move easily.


“[Discipline] is associated with punishment, control, oppression, and pain. Interdisciplinarity … [has the] potential to serve as a euphemism of academic or artistic freedom.”(1) “[Transdisciplinarity involves] the formation of knowledges that require our disciplinary scholarship and technique but demand that we abandon disciplinary mastery and surveillance.”(2) “In cities in the United States, we cannot pretend that all bodies have the freedom to move through, occupy, and enjoy public space. The perception of black and brown bodies gathering in public space routinely reads as suspect, criminal, or illegitimate.”(3) “Monumental structures of concrete and steel embody a systematic social inequality, a way of engineering relationships among people.”(4) “These features of the built environment control and constrain our behavior.”(5) [How can transdisciplinarity be used to achieve real freedom in our built environment?]


NOTES
1. Mark Linder, “Transdisciplinarity,” Hunch: The Berlage Institute Report, n. 9 (2005), 13.
2. Homi Bhabha, “Translator Translated: W. J. T. Mitchell Talks with Homi Bhabha,” Artforum (March 1995), 118.
3. Iris Ferguson, “How Urban Design Perpetuates Racial Inequality—and What We Can Do About It,” Co.Design (July 2016).
4. Langdon Winner, “Do Artifacts Have Politics?,” Daedalus(Winter 1980), 124.
5. Sarah B. Schindler, “Architectural Exclusion: Discrimination and Segregation through Physical Design of the Built Environment,” Yale Law Journal (April 2015), 1,934.
Mark